My iPod #459: The Beatles – Good Morning Good Morning

“Good Morning Good Morning” tends to be the song from Sgt. Pepper that not even Beatles fans really appreciate a lot. Upon listening to the album for the first time in 2009 or so, I found the track to be one of the most likeable ones on there. I don’t want to say that it was simplicity that attracted me to it because the song has quite a complex structure to it, though it’s really the only track on there (apart from the title track’s reprise) which focuses on the four members and their guitars (sort of), bass and drums.

Inspired by a Kellogg’s Corn Flakes advert he saw on the television, John Lennon went on to write the song which can only be described as one of the observational kind in which he describes what he sees going on around him while he’s at work, in the town for a while after finishing the shift, at home for tea and when he’s at a show where he’s able to glance at the girls around him. So the subject matter is not as ‘deep’ on this song as for the majority of the others on Sgt. Pepper, but there musically there are plenty of things about it that hold it up as one of the best ones on there.

It changes its time signature many times. That’s something that still confuses me, and if I were to get all technical about it you would not be able to understand it either. Ringo and Paul own the rhythm section on here. The former playing on a drum kit utilising two bass drums which can be heard in full force during the final minute or so, and whilst playing a sliding bass line which maintains the song’s momentum, Paul showcases his guitar skills by shredding out a soaring guitar solo in the middle. Also, as the song begins to fade out and all the animal noises pan from ear to ear John, Paul, and George jokingly begin to sing in German. What more could you want.

So yeah, “Good Morning Good Morning” deserves more praise than from what I’ve witnessed. Just as important and infectiously catchy.

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Author: Jamie Kyei Manteaw

An English student at Coventry University who spends most days listening to music (old and new) and reading and writing about it, however informal it may be. And studying too, obviously.

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